rye loaf

Sourdough Rye with Hemp, Linseed & Camelina

by Sarah Cotterell and Aitana Infante

Sarah and Aitana make this rye loaf every week. It’s wonderfully simple but utterly delicious with both sweet and savoury meal. They like it best toasted, spread thickly with home-made jam and salted butter or with scrambled eggs. But it goes well with just about anything.

The high sourdough starter content means this loaf stays moist for ages - if you can resist eating it. The nuttiness of the hemp and linseeds combines beautifully with the earthiness of the camelina and rye but feel free to add whichever seeds you fancy. And once you get the hang of it, you can experiment by adding delights such as sprouted grains or dried fruit and nuts.

For more brilliant recipes from Sarah and Aitana, check out their cookbook A La Mesa which celebrates seasonal British produce and encourages us all to reconnect with how, where and by whom the food we eat is grown and to feel empowered cooking it.

Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients

Method

  1. In a large bowl, mix together your bubbly starter with the very warm water. Next add your flour, mixing together until it’s completely incorporated.
  2. Next fold in the salt, followed by the seeds. The mix will be thick and quite wet but that’s okay as there’s no need to knead! Using a wet dough scraper will help you bring the mix together.
  3. Lightly oil your tin, making sure you cover the sides as well as the base. Use your dough scraper to tip the mix into the tin and gently smooth down the top to an even-ish surface. Sprinkle over a few more seeds, gently pressing them into dough.
  4. Cover the tin with a damp tea towel or food-safe plastic bag and leave somewhere warm to ferment overnight.
  5. The next morning, set your oven to 210 C. Once the oven is nice and hot, pop the tin into the centre of the middle shelf and quickly close the door. Bake the loaf for around 40- 50 minutes.
  6. Once cooked, remove from the oven and use a spatula to carefully flip the rye loaf out of the tin and onto a cooling rack. This stops if from getting a soggy bottom.
  7. The rye needs to be completely cool before you slice it, as otherwise it’ll fall apart. Some say it’s best to wait until the next day, but we’ll leave that up to you. Once you’ve started to eat it keep the loaf wrapped in a clean tea towel, to keep it fresh.



Sarah Cotterell and Aitana Infante
Sarah Cotterell and Aitana Infante

Author



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Recipes for Pulses, Grains, Seeds, Flakes, Flour, Ferments...

Crispy Fava Beans, Whipped Tofu & Red Chicory
Crispy Fava Beans, Whipped Tofu & Red Chicory

by Eden Owen-Jones

Eden Owen-Jones' light, silky and creamy whipped tofu dip is topped with split fava beans crisped in the oven to add a lovely crunch. Serve with deliciously bitter red endive leaves or spoon it over grilled radicchio.

Read More

Wild Mushroom & Barley Risotto
Wild Mushroom & Barley Risotto

by Sarah Cotterell and Aitana Infante

Sarah and Aitana use our pearled naked barley rather than traditional arborio rice for this risotto - or perhaps that should be orzotto? Barley’s nutty flavour complements the earthy mushrooms well. This recipe can be varied with other whole grains like naked oats or black barley.

Read More

Chickpea Pancakes with Creamy Mushrooms and Spinach
Chickpea Pancakes with Creamy Mushrooms and Spinach

by Amy Oboussier

Savoury pancakes like these make a decadent dinner though the pancakes are incredibly simple to make with just three ingredients - chickpea flour, water and salt. Any pulse flour would work well in this recipe.

Read More