Malted Naked Oat Loaf

Malted Naked Oat Loaf

by Amy Oboussier

Malted naked oat flour gives this loaf a deliciously creamy sweetness while the whole grains add a pleasing crunch. Together they make for a hearty loaf with a rich complex flavour.

If you're new to working with malted flours, 10% is a great starting point - malted flour can be quite lively to bake with, so keep an eye on your loaf as it rises. If it's a warmer day you may need to reduce the proofing times. When you become used to working with this flour affect the rise, feel free to increase the proportion in the mix.

Makes 1 Loaf, around 800g

Ingredients

Method

  1. Combine all the ingredients, apart from the whole oats, and mix to form a shaggy dough.
  2. Turn out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for 10 minutes. At first the dough may seem a little wet, but keep kneading until your dough is smooth and elastic.
  3. Return to dough to the bowl, cover with a damp tea towel and leave to rise for 45 mins at room temperature.
  4. Add a little water to the whole oats and leave them to soak while the dough rises. This will stop the dried gain absorbing water from the dough and creating a dry loaf.
  5. Turn out the dough onto the work surface, knock it back and add the whole malted oats. Knead to combine. Leave the for 10 mins to allow the gluten to relax.
  6. Grease a 1kg loaf tin with a little butter or oil.
  7. Wet the surface and hands with a little water. Flatten the dough into a round, fold the top down to the centre and the bottom up to meet the middle. Turn the dough so you have a long rectangle in front of you. Tuck and roll the dough from the bottom to top and place in the loaf tin.
  8. Cover with a cloth and leave to rise for around 40 mins or until doubled in size.
  9. Preheat the oven to 200C / gas mark 6.
  10. Dust the top of the loaf with flour and bake for 45 minutes. The baked loaf should be a deep brown and the base sound hollow when tapped.
  11. Tip out of the tin and leave to cool on a wire rack.



Amy Oboussier
Amy Oboussier

Author



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